Internal Motivation, Perceived Health Competency, and Health Literacy in Primary and Secondary Cancer Prevention

Document Type: Research Articles

Authors

1 Department of health management and Policy, School of Medicine, Kangwon National University

2 Department of Cancer Management, Gangwon Cancer Center

Abstract

 
Objective: The aim of this study was to identify associations of internal motivation, perceived health competency, and health literacy with primary and secondary cancer prevention. Methods: A telephone survey was conducted with a sample of 2,700, 30-69 year olds, proportionally extracted from Gangwon Province, South Korea. The dependent variables were actions in primary and secondary prevention and the explanatory variables were 13 questions in three areas: internal motivation (4 items), perceived health competency (4 items), and health literacy (5 items). Result: Multiple linear regression analysis showed that internal motivation, perceived health competency, and health literacy positively impacted primary prevention after controlling for gender and age. As internal motivation, perceived health competency, and perceived literacy increased by 1 point, primary prevention scores increased by 0.11, 0.11, and 0.07 points, respectively. In addition, logistic regression results for secondary prevention showed that health literacy had a positive impact on secondary behavior. As health literacy increased by 1 point, the odds ratio of the practice of secondary prevention was 1.4 times higher. Conclusion: This study suggests that primary and secondary prevention of cancer are significantly related to intrinsic motivation factors, perceived health competency, and actual health literacy. Health literacy concepts that cover the capacity of health management in comprehensive areas need to be applied to education and promotion for improvement of primary and secondary prevention of cancer.

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