Factors Associated with Delayed Diagnosis of Lymphomas: Experience with Patients from Hematology Centers in Morocco

Document Type: Research Articles

Authors

1 Laboratory of Community Health, Clinical Research and et Epidemiology, Department of Public Health, Faculty of Medicine and Pharmacy, University Mohammed V, Rabat, Morocco.

2 Laboratory of Biostatistics, Clinical Research and et Epidemiology, Department of Public Health, Faculty of Medicine and Pharmacy, University Mohammed V, Rabat, Morocco.

3 Laboratory of Epidemiology and Clinical Research, Faculty of medicine and pharmacy, Fez, Morocco.

4 Laboratory of Epidemiology and Clinical Research, Faculty of medicine and pharmacy, Oujda, Morocco.

5 Pediatric oncology and haematology Center, University Hospital Center of Casablanca, Morocco.

6 LALLA SALMA Foundation for Prevention and Control of Cancer, Rabat, Morocco.

7 University Mohammed VI, Mohammed VI Foundation, Casablanca, Morocco.

Abstract

 
Background: Moroccan cancer patients usually have to go through several steps before they are diagnosed. It is important to assess factors associated with diagnosis delay for lymphomas, which might have significant effects on survival. The aim of this study was to determine factors leading to late diagnosis of lymphomas. Methods: A cross-sectional study was conducted with three hematology centers in Morocco in 2008, to analyze the impact of sociodemographic and clinical factors on delay-time from symptoms to diagnosis. Results: A total of 151 patients were included in the study. Late delay was significantly associated with gender, (for men compared to women: OR=2.46; 95% CI: 1.06-5.74), to marital status (not married: OR=2.50; 95% CI: 1.06-5.92) and low socioeconomic level (OR=5.82; 95% CI: 2.23-15.17). Late medical delay was significantly associated with having three or more medical visits before diagnosis (Adjusted OR=5.67; 95% CI: 2.55-12.59). Late total delay was observed for patients with three children or less (adjusted OR=4.39; 95% CI: 1.32-14.56), those who were non-married (adjusted OR=2.49; 95% CI: 1.07-5.81), had a non Hodgkin’s lymphoma (Adjusted OR=2.08; 95% CI: 1.06-4.00) or featuring three or more medical visits before the diagnosis (Adjusted OR=2.13; 95% CI: 0.99-5.88). Conclusion: This analysis provides a basis for understanding the sources, extent, and root causes of lymphoma diagnostic delays. The findings appear crucial for system-wide interventions aimed to facilitate clinical management of patients with lymphoma and to improve prognosis and quality of life.

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