Pregnancy Outcomes after Conservative Surgery for Early-Stage Ovarian Neoplasms

Document Type: Research Articles

Authors

Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Faculty of Medicine Siriraj Hospital, Mahidol University, Bangkok 10700, Thailand.

Abstract

 
Objective: This retrospective, single institute study aimed to evaluate pregnancy and oncologic outcomes in reproductive-age Thai women with early-stage ovarian neoplasms undergoing conservative surgical treatment. Methods: Medical records of 84 women of reproductive age (15-45 years) with histologically confirmed early-stage (IA-IIC) borderline ovarian tumors or cancers who had undergone conservative surgery between January 2003 and December 2012 were retrospectively reviewed. Results: The mean age of patients at diagnosis was 28.0 years (SD 7.2). Histologically, 30 (35.7%) had borderline ovarian tumors, 28 (33.3%) epithelial cancers, 22 (26.2%) malignant germ cell tumors, and 4 (4.8%) sex cord stromal tumors. Thirty-five women (41.7%) had complete surgical staging performed, whereas 49 (58.3%) underwent an incomplete staging procedure. Thirty-four patients (40.5%) received postoperative chemotherapy. Among 29 patients subsequently attempting pregnancy, 15 conceived successfully (51.7%). Pregnancy outcomes were one spontaneous abortion and 14 viable births. There were no serious adverse obstetric and neonatal outcomes among women with documented live births and no reported fetal abnormalities. Pregnancy rates were not impacted by surgical staging (53.8% vs 50.0%, p=0.837) or adjuvant chemotherapy (55.6% vs 50.0%, p=0.782). The 5-year disease-free survival was 91.0% and pregnancy after conservative surgery did not affect progression-free survival (p=0.194). Conclusion: Conservative surgery with or without appropriate adjuvant chemotherapy can be offered to young women with early-stage ovarian neoplasms who wish to preserve their fertility potential.

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