Association between Low Fruit and Vegetable Consumption and Colorectal Polyps in Thailand

Document Type: Research Articles

Authors

1 Department of Nursing, Chulabhorn Hospital, HRH Princess Chulabhorn College of Medical Science, Chulabhorn Royal Academy, Bangkok, Thailand.

2 Department of Surgery, Faculty of Medicine and Public Health, HRH Princess Chulabhorn College of Medical Science, Chulabhorn Royal Academy, Bangkok, Thailand.

3 Data Management Unit, HRH Princess Chulabhorn College of Medical Science, Chulabhorn Royal Academy, Bangkok, Thailand.

Abstract

Objective: This study aimed to evaluate the association between low fruit and vegetable consumption and colorectal polyps. Methods: A retrospective study was conducted among 1,228 participants aged 50-65 years who completed 2-time colonoscopy exams at the first and the fifth year of a colorectal screening program. Consuming less than one serving of fruit and vegetable daily was rated as low. Colorectal polyps from colonoscopy findings were recognized in 3 types: hyperplastic, low risk and high risk adenomatous polyps. Results: The findings demonstrated high prevalence of low fruit (93.6%) and low vegetable (85.8%) consumption. Exercising individuals were more likely to consume both fruit (OR 2.28, 95%CI 1.42-3.65) and vegetable (OR 1.40, 95%CI 1.00-1.96), while smoking history individuals tended to consume vegetable (OR 2.08, 95%CI 1.22-3.55). Low fruit consumption was strongly associated with high risk adenomatous polyps (OR 4.39, 95%CI 2.40-8.03), while low vegetable consumption was distinctively associated with low risk (OR 6.26, 95%CI 4.11-9.55) and high risk adenomatous polyps (OR 8.64, 95%CI 5.30-14.09). Conclusion: This study provides additional evidence of the association between low fruit and vegetable consumption and colorectal polyps. Enhancing people fiber eating behavior may help preventing colorectal cancer risk.

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